South Western wrestler Aram Moffit
South Western wrestler Aram Moffit (DAILY RECORD/SUNDAY NEWS --- FILE)

South Western senior Aram Moffit has been wrestling since he was five years old. It has become one of his greatest passions.

Recently, Moffit achieved one of his childhood dreams when he committed to wrestle at Millersville University.

"It was always my dream," Moffit said of wrestling in college. "It hasn't really sunk in yet though. I don't think it will until I start my first day of wrestling practice up there and it may not even be until I start my first match. It will be a lot different. Just the fact that I am one of a small percentage of people who play college athletics."

Moffit had narrowed his college choices down to five several months ago. His list included Shippensburg, West Liberty, Campbellsville (Ky.), Lindsey Wilson College (Ky.) and Millersville. He took visits to Shippensburg and West Liberty.

Once he visited the campus at Millersville and met with the coaching staff, the decision became rather easy.

"They were pursuing me, as opposed to the other way around which is how it was with a lot of the other schools," he said. "They had a personal visit for me, so that was obviously a very good way to get to know each other and we kind of sat down and talked, and they were really up front with me on everything and I could really connect well with the coaches and I could wrestle for them and they could do well for me and it sounded like they really knew what they were talking about."

Moffit was given a personal tour of the campus and despite the fact that school was not in session because of winter break, he fell in love with the atmosphere.


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"It is the perfect size campus for me," he said. "I like the smaller campuses and that was another thing that I really liked that persuaded me to choose them."

He also had the opportunity to talk to Brad Ladd, a senior heavyweight at Millersville who graduated from Dallastown High School.

"He pointed out that the coaches were really there for you and that it was not just all about them which is what you want," Moffit said. "When you talk to other kids and they see things that you don't see, that kinda helps with finding pros and cons in it. That was a nice thing to have, a couple of kids you knew who were going to that school."

Moffit, also a member of the South Western football team, chose to pursue wrestling in college during his senior season when he realized that he was garnering more interest for wrestling than he was for football.

"I always figured I would go somewhere for college but then I kept on getting more and more looks and offers for wrestling than football, and I just love the sport," he said. "I love wrestling much more than football."

Moffit plans to major in criminology and sociology with the hopes of becoming a probation officer or police officer when he graduates.

After concluding a very successful high school career, Moffit now has his sights set on some pretty lofty goals for college.

"My goal is to be an All-American my freshman year which is a big goal," he said. "I know I'll have to work really hard in the off-season. Pretty much my whole summer will consist of lifting and training. I will be doing speed training and the Millersville wrestling workout, and hopefully go up there a few times for their open mats so I can get acclimated. You have to get strong and big because it is a totally different stage. Everybody up there is contending like you are. The stronger you are, the better it will help and the better your technique, the better you will be."

The coaching staff at Millersville wants Moffit to wrestle 197 pounds which is fine with him because his natural weight hovers around 205-210.

Now that high school wrestling is over, he is just left with the lasting memories.

"My favorite one is probably knocking off the number two seed at districts in the second round," he said. "Everybody was doubting me and said that I wasn't going to be able to do it. I definitely think that will be a big memory."

He can now look ahead to four years of new memories he is yet to create.